Annual Protest to ‘Fight Krebs’ Raises €150K+

Credit to Author: BrianKrebs| Date: Mon, 30 Mar 2020 17:42:52 +0000

In 2018, KrebsOnSecurity unmasked the creators of Coinhive — a now-defunct cryptocurrency mining service that was being massively abused by cybercriminals — as the administrators of a popular German language image-hosting forum. In protest of that story, forum members donated hundreds of thousands of euros to nonprofits that combat cancer (Krebs means “cancer” in German). This week, the forum is celebrating its third annual observance of that protest to “fight Krebs,” albeit with a Coronavirus twist.

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Cryptojacking in the post-Coinhive era

Credit to Author: Jérôme Segura| Date: Thu, 02 May 2019 15:00:00 +0000

Cryptojacking captured everyone’s attention in 2017 and 2018. With Coinhive no longer in business, has this threat been completely snuffed out?

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The post Cryptojacking in the post-Coinhive era appeared first on Malwarebytes Labs.

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Annual Protest Raises $250K to Cure Krebs

Credit to Author: BrianKrebs| Date: Sun, 31 Mar 2019 08:51:02 +0000

For the second year in a row, denizens of a large German-language online forum have donated more than USD $250,000 to cancer research organizations in protest of a story KrebsOnSecurity published in 2018 that unmasked the creators of Coinhive, a now-defunct cryptocurrency mining service that was massively abused by cybercriminals. Krebs is translated as “cancer” in German.

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Crypto Mining Service Coinhive to Call it Quits

Credit to Author: BrianKrebs| Date: Wed, 27 Feb 2019 23:19:28 +0000

Roughly one year ago, KrebsOnSecurity published a lengthy investigation into the individuals behind Coinhive[.]com, a cryptocurrency mining service that has been heavily abused to force hacked Web sites to mine virtual currency. On Tuesday, Coinhive announced plans to pull the plug on the project early next month.

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Fake browser update seeks to compromise more MikroTik routers

Credit to Author: Malwarebytes Labs| Date: Fri, 12 Oct 2018 15:00:06 +0000

Threat actors are social engineering users with a fake update that, once installed, will scan the Internet in an attempt to exploit vulnerable MikroTik routers.

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Cryptojacking apps return to Google Play Market

Credit to Author: Pankaj Kohli| Date: Mon, 24 Sep 2018 16:01:30 +0000

At least 25 Android apps on the official Google Play store contain code that mines cryptocurrencies in the background.<img src=”http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/sophos/dgdY/~4/F8aH5rlcN50″ height=”1″ width=”1″ alt=””/>

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Obfuscated Coinhive shortlink reveals larger mining operation

Credit to Author: Jérôme Segura| Date: Tue, 03 Jul 2018 15:00:00 +0000

A web miner injected into compromised sites is just the tip of the iceberg for an infrastructure hosting malicious Windows and Linux coin miners.

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Coinhive Exposé Prompts Cancer Research Fundraiser

Credit to Author: BrianKrebs| Date: Fri, 30 Mar 2018 17:55:56 +0000

A story published here this week revealed the real-life identity behind the original creator of Coinhive — a controversial cryptocurrency mining service that several security firms have recently labeled the most ubiquitous malware threat on the Internet today. In an unusual form of protest against that story, members of a popular German language image-posting board founded by the Coinhive creator have vented their dismay by donating tens of thousands of euros to local charities that support cancer research. On Monday KrebsOnSecurity published Who and What is Coinhive, an in-depth story which proved that the founder of Coinhive was indeed the founder of the German image hosting and discussion forum pr0gramm[dot]com (not safe for work). I undertook the research because Coinhive’s code primarily is found on tens of thousands of hacked Web sites, and because the until-recently anonymous Coinhive operator(s) have been reluctant to take steps that might curb the widespread abuse of their platform.

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