Apple bans cryptocurrency mining apps on iOS to protect mobile users

Credit to Author: Lucas Mearian| Date: Tue, 12 Jun 2018 12:36:00 -0700

Using an iPad or iPhone to mine bitcoin or other cryptocurrencies would be hard to do, as the CPU power available to complete the task would be a drop in the bucket compared to what’s needed.

But using a portion of the CPU power from thousands of iPads or iPhones to mine cryptocurrency makes more sense – and that’s exactly what some malware has been doing.

Apple is now moving to stop the practice.

[ Further reading: The way blockchain-based cryptocurrencies are governed could soon change ]

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Blockchain and the IoT: 2 of the 5 elements that will change your world

Credit to Author: Nicolas Windpassinger| Date: Tue, 12 Jun 2018 12:36:56 +0000

Blockchain: After the hype, back to real life Even if blockchain technology must still overcome some challenges, there has recently been a clear change in the attitudes and initiatives regarding… Read more »

The post Blockchain and the IoT: 2 of the 5 elements that will change your world appeared first on Schneider Electric Blog.

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Solving a blockchain conundrum: Biometrics could recover lost encryption keys

Credit to Author: Lucas Mearian| Date: Thu, 17 May 2018 03:11:00 -0700

Blockchain could one day solve the online privacy problem by encrypting or scrambling personally identifiable information and issuing each person a random string of bits – a private key – created explicitly for unscrambling their data.

The person holding the blockchain private key could issue various public keys controlling who has access to the personal data on the blockchain. So, for instance, if a car rental agency needed to verify you have a driver’s license, you could use a public key to give them access to that information.

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Mingis on Tech: Lessons from RSA 2018

Credit to Author: Ken Mingis| Date: Wed, 09 May 2018 03:30:00 -0700

This year’s RSA Conference in San Francisco had a lot of ground to cover. Cybersecurity, of course. Fending off ransomware attacks. Building security best practices into employee training.

But, according to CSO’s Steve Ragan, the hottest topics at the 2018 conference were this month’s looming GDPR deadline and blockchain, blockchain, blockchain. (In fact, the two are often part of the same conversation.)

Ragan, who attended RSA, spoke with Computerworld Executive Editor Ken Mingis about what he learned, with a special focus on the May 25 GDPR deadline and what companies are scrambling to do to protect their data.

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Will blockchain run afoul of GDPR? (Yes and no)

Credit to Author: Lucas Mearian| Date: Mon, 07 May 2018 03:02:00 -0700

As the EU prepares to roll out new data protection regulations this month, concerns are emerging that they could dissuade businesses from rolling out blockchain-based projects because the online transaction technology might innately break the new rules.

The EU’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) targets citizens’ personally identifiable information (PII), providing transparency around its use and giving people the right to restrict its use or request it be deleted all together.

While GDPR never mentions PII, the new rules describing “personal data” are synonymous with it: “Any information that relates to an identified or identifiable living individual. Different pieces of information, which collected together can lead to the identification of a particular person, also constitute personal data.” In short, it means any data that can be tied back to person’s identity.

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N.Y. AG's scrutiny of cryptocurrencies unlikely to stymie a thriving industry

Credit to Author: Lucas Mearian| Date: Fri, 20 Apr 2018 13:30:00 -0700

States and the federal government are increasing their scrutiny of cryptocurrencies in an attempt to bring more transparency to a market where buyers and sellers are anonymous and regulatory oversight is light.

Cryptocurrencies such as Bitcoin, Ether, LiteCoin, and Ripple skyrocketed in value last year as investors sought to get in on what many see as the future of global currency – one that for trade and commerce knows no borders. Bitcoin generated massive hype among investors as its value surged more than 1,900% to nearly $20,000 last year, before tumbling back down below $11,000.

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How blockchain could solve the internet privacy problem

Credit to Author: Lucas Mearian| Date: Mon, 09 Apr 2018 03:00:00 -0700

Fintech firms, software makers, telecom providers and other businesses have joined forces develop a blockchain-based network that will enable anyone to exchange digital credentials online and without the risk of unintentionally exposing any private data.

The companies are part of the Sovrin Foundation, a new nonprofit organization now developing the Sovrin Network, which could enable anyone to globally exchange pre-verified data with any entity also on the network.

The online credentials would be akin to identify information you or I might have in our physical wallets: a driver’s license, a bank debit card or a company ID.

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This is how blockchain might solve the internet privacy problem

Credit to Author: Lucas Mearian| Date: Mon, 09 Apr 2018 03:00:00 -0700

Fintech firms, software makers, telecom providers and other businesses have joined forces develop a blockchain-based network that will enable anyone to exchange digital credentials online and without the risk of unintentionally exposing any private data.

The companies are part of the Sovrin Foundation, a new nonprofit organization now developing the Sovrin Network, which could enable anyone to globally exchange pre-verified data with any entity also on the network.

The online credentials would be akin to identify information you or I might have in our physical wallets: a driver’s license, a bank debit card or a company ID.

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