Why & Where You Should Plant Your Flag

Credit to Author: BrianKrebs| Date: Wed, 12 Aug 2020 14:18:09 +0000

Several stories here have highlighted the importance of creating accounts online tied to your various identity, financial and communications services before identity thieves do it for you. This post examines some of the key places where everyone should plant their virtual flags.

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Why & Where You Should You Plant Your Flag

Credit to Author: BrianKrebs| Date: Wed, 12 Aug 2020 14:18:09 +0000

Several stories here have highlighted the importance of creating accounts online tied to your various identity, financial and communications services before identity thieves do it for you. This post examines some of the key places where everyone should plant their virtual flags.

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Equifax Has Chosen Experian. Wait, What?

Credit to Author: BrianKrebs| Date: Thu, 01 Nov 2018 16:47:13 +0000

A year after offering free credit monitoring to all Americans on account of its massive data breach that exposed the personal information of nearly 148 million people, Equifax now says it has chosen to extend the offer by turning to a credit monitoring service offered by a top competitor — Experian. And to do that, it will soon be sharing with Experian contact information that affected consumers gave to Equifax in order to sign up for the service. 

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Credit Freezes are Free: Let the Ice Age Begin

Credit to Author: BrianKrebs| Date: Fri, 21 Sep 2018 16:31:43 +0000

It is now free in every U.S. state to freeze and unfreeze your credit file and that of your dependents, a process that blocks identity thieves and others from looking at private details in your consumer credit history. If you’ve been holding out because you’re not particularly worried about ID theft, here’s another reason to reconsider: The credit bureaus profit from selling copies of your file to others, so freezing your file also lets you deny these dinosaurs a valuable revenue stream.

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In a Few Days, Credit Freezes Will Be Fee-Free

Credit to Author: BrianKrebs| Date: Tue, 11 Sep 2018 02:26:06 +0000

Later this month, all of the three major consumer credit bureaus will be required to offer free credit freezes to all Americans and their dependents. Maybe you’ve been holding off freezing your credit file because your home state currently charges a fee for placing or thawing a credit freeze, or because you believe it’s just not worth the hassle. If that accurately describes your views on the matter, this post may well change your mind.

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Think You’ve Got Your Credit Freezes Covered? Think Again.

Credit to Author: BrianKrebs| Date: Wed, 09 May 2018 13:36:04 +0000

I spent a few days last week speaking at and attending a conference on responding to identity theft. The forum was held in Florida, one of the major epicenters for identity fraud complaints in United States. One gripe I heard from several presenters was that identity thieves increasingly are finding ways to open new mobile phone accounts in the names of people who have already frozen their credit files with the big-three credit bureaus. Here’s a look at what may be going on, and how you can protect yourself.

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Think You’ve Got Your Credit Freezes Covered? Think Again.

Credit to Author: BrianKrebs| Date: Wed, 09 May 2018 13:36:04 +0000

I spent a few days last week speaking at and attending a conference on responding to identity theft. The forum was held in Florida, one of the major epicenters for identity fraud complaints in United States. One gripe I heard from several presenters was that identity thieves increasingly are finding ways to open new lines of credit for things like mobile phones on people who have already frozen their credit files with the big-three credit bureaus. Here’s a look at what may be going on, and how you can protect yourself.

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Survey: Americans Spent $1.4B on Credit Freeze Fees in Wake of Equifax Breach

Credit to Author: BrianKrebs| Date: Thu, 22 Mar 2018 14:08:46 +0000

Almost 20 percent of Americans froze their credit file with one or more of the big three credit bureaus in the wake of last year’s data breach at Equifax, costing consumers an estimated $1.4 billion, according to a new study. The findings come as lawmakers in Congress are debating legislation that would make credit freezes free in every state. The figures, commissioned by small business loan provider Fundera and conducted by Wakefield Research, surveyed some 1,000 adults in the U.S. Respondents were asked to self-report how much they spent on the freezes; 32 percent said the freezes cost them $10 or less, but 38 percent said the total cost was $30 or more. The average cost to consumers who froze their credit after the Equifax breach was $23. A credit freeze blocks potential creditors from being able to view or “pull” your credit file, making it far more difficult for identity thieves to apply for new lines of credit in your name.

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