Microsoft touts first PCs to ship natively with secure Pluton chip

Credit to Author: Lucas Mearian| Date: Wed, 12 Jan 2022 03:00:00 -0800

As organizations continue to wrestle with how to manage a hybrid workforce, security outside the corporate firewall continues to play a huge role in day-to-day IT operations.

Following the October release of Windows 11, which boasted features aimed at enabling hybrid work, Microsoft last week announced the first PCs with its Pluton chip-to-cloud security technology. The technology is aimed at securing the computers of remote workers and others.

At CES, Microsoft announced that Lenovo and chipmaker AMD have launched the first laptops — the ThinkPad Z13 and ThankPad Z16 — that come natively with the Pluton security chips. Pricing for the ThinkPad Z13 starts at $1,549, pricing for the ThinkPad Z16 starts at $2,099. Both laptops will be available in May and Lenovo said there is no additional cost associated with the Pluton chip inside.

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Windows 11: Just say no

Credit to Author: Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols| Date: Thu, 16 Sep 2021 03:15:00 -0700

It will be one thing, say, later this year or in 2022, to buy a new PC with Windows 11. We can be reasonably certain that Windows 11 will run on your new Dell, HP, or Lenovo PC. Maybe some of your drivers and programs won’t run, but Windows 11 itself? No problem.

But, if you want to update your existing computers, especially those that have a few years on them — that’s another story. It’s difficult to know whether any given computer will run Windows 11, which arrives Oct. 5. Yes, there’s Microsoft’s PC Health Check app and other programs to determine whether you can run Windows 11. But Microsoft pulled it the first time around and I’m none too sure how reliable it is this time around.

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Business laptop? $1,000. Sending away the thief? Priceless.

Credit to Author: Sharky| Date: Tue, 14 May 2019 03:00:00 -0700

The time is 2001, not long after 9/11, and the place is New York City. Heightened security awareness is the order of the day, and everyone in pilot fish’s office is required to carry an access card that activates the office doors. Look out for tailgaters, they’re all told. Those are people dressed like professionals who slide in behind someone with an access card and then steal wallets, coats and more.

One morning, fish arrives at the office and passes a man in business-casual attire carrying a laptop tucked under his arm and headed for the elevators. Fish doesn’t recognize the fellow, but he does know the co-worker who is running behind him, calling for someone to call building security and the police. The co-worker had returned to an empty desk just seconds after this tailgater had snatched his laptop, well before the tailgater could make a clean getaway.

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