Galaxy users, take note: Samsung's probably selling your data

Credit to Author: JR Raphael| Date: Wed, 22 Jan 2020 03:00:00 -0800

Relying on Google services, as most of us Android-carrying primates do, comes with a certain tradeoff. It’s no big secret or anything: Google makes its money by selling ads, which are more effective when they’re catered to our interests — the subjects we tend to search about, the things we buy (when Google knows about ’em, at least), and often even the places we go with our location-enabled phones in tow (and/or in toe, for the monkeys among us).

That’s all par for the course, as I frequently say — part of the deal we all accept when we use Google services. That’s what makes it possible for Google to give us top-notch apps for free, and it’s also what opens the door to certain advanced features that wouldn’t be possible without that information’s presence.

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Feds may already have found a way to hack into Apple iPhones

Credit to Author: Lucas Mearian| Date: Thu, 16 Jan 2020 14:05:00 -0800

After Apple turned down a request by U.S. Attorney General William Barr this week to unlock two iPhones used by a terrorist suspect in a recent deadly shooting, the FBI appears to already have the tools needed to access the smartphones.

Apple turned down a request from U.S. Attorney General William Barr saying it would  not help unlock two iPhones used by the shooter, 21-year-old Mohammed Saeed Alshamrani. He is believed to have acted alone when he shot and killed three service members and wounded several others at the Naval Air Station in Pensacola, Fla. last month.

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Breaking iPhone encryption won't make anyone safer

Credit to Author: Jonny Evans| Date: Wed, 15 Jan 2020 05:06:00 -0800

Imagine all your tax documentation could be examined by officials from any government merely on suspicion. That’s the future some governments are pushing for when they demand Apple puts security backdoors into its products.

Making no one safe

Think about the nature of security backdoors:

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Apple refuses latest government iPhone-unlock request

Credit to Author: Lucas Mearian| Date: Tue, 14 Jan 2020 12:30:00 -0800

Apple turned down a request from U.S. Attorney General William Barr this week,  saying it will not help unlock two iPhones used by a terrorist suspect last month in the deadly shooting at the Naval Air Station in Pensacola, Fla.

Barr said the shooter, 21-year-old Mohammed Saeed Alshamrani, acted alone when he shot and killed three service members and wounded several others, including two sheriff’s deputies responding to the attack. Alshamrani, a member of the Saudi Air Force and an aviation student at the base, was shot dead on the scene by police.

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United States government-funded phones come pre-installed with unremovable malware

Credit to Author: Nathan Collier| Date: Thu, 09 Jan 2020 16:00:00 +0000

A US-funded government assistance program is selling budget-friendly mobile phones that come pre-installed with unremovable malicious apps. Malwarebytes Labs investigates the malware’s origins.

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Apple wants privacy laws to protect its users

Credit to Author: Jonny Evans| Date: Wed, 08 Jan 2020 06:54:00 -0800

Your iPhone (like most smartphones) knows when it is picked up, what you do with it, who you call, where you go, who you know – and a bunch more personal information, too.

The snag with your device knowing all this information is that once the data is understood, that information can be shared or even used against you.

Information is power

Jane Horvath, Apple’s senior director for global privacy, appeared at CES 2020 this week to discuss the company’s approach to smartphone security. She stressed the company’s opposition to the creation of software backdoors into devices, and also said:

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Apple’s wants privacy laws to protect its users

Credit to Author: Jonny Evans| Date: Wed, 08 Jan 2020 06:54:00 -0800

Your iPhone (like most smartphones) knows when it is picked up, what you do with it, who you call, where you go, who you know – and a bunch more personal information, too.

Information is power

The snag with your device knowing all this information is that once the data is understood than that information can be shared or even used against you.

Jane Horvath, Apple’s senior director for global privacy, appeared at CES 2012 to discuss the company’s approach to smartphone security.

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