Apple wins praise for adding 'USB Restricted Mode' to secure iPhones

Credit to Author: Lucas Mearian| Date: Thu, 14 Jun 2018 12:43:00 -0700

Apple confirmed today it will close a security hole that has allowed law enforcement officials, working with forensic companies, to break into iPhones to retrieve data related to criminal investigations.

In the upcoming release of iOS 12, Apple will change default settings on iPhones to shutter access to the USB port when the phone has not been unlocked for one hour. In its beta release of iOS 11.3, Apple introduced the feature – known as USB Restricted Mode – but cut it from iOS 11.3 before that version was released publicly.

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Which Android phones get regular security updates? Here's a hint

Credit to Author: JR Raphael| Date: Thu, 14 Jun 2018 08:48:00 -0700

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Is your company part of the GDPR 'mobile loophole'?

Credit to Author: Jack Gold| Date: Thu, 14 Jun 2018 08:13:00 -0700

Mobile tech, and especially mobile brought into companies through BYOD, has unique challenges for companies that need to comply with General Data Protection Regulations (GDPR) — and that’s virtually all companies, not just the ones in Europe. The regulations compel companies to manage personal data and protect privacy, and they provide individuals to have a say in what and how data about them is used.

GDPR has several disclosure and control requirements, such as providing notice of any personally identifiable data collection, notifying of any data breaches, obtaining consent of any person for whom data is being collected, recording what and how data is being used, and providing a right for people whose data is being collected to see, modify, and/or delete any information about them from corporate systems.

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Apple bans cryptocurrency mining apps on iOS to protect mobile users

Credit to Author: Lucas Mearian| Date: Tue, 12 Jun 2018 12:36:00 -0700

Using an iPad or iPhone to mine bitcoin or other cryptocurrencies would be hard to do, as the CPU power available to complete the task would be a drop in the bucket compared to what’s needed.

But using a portion of the CPU power from thousands of iPads or iPhones to mine cryptocurrency makes more sense – and that’s exactly what some malware has been doing.

Apple is now moving to stop the practice.

[ Further reading: The way blockchain-based cryptocurrencies are governed could soon change ]

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A week in security (June 4 – June 10)

Credit to Author: Malwarebytes Labs| Date: Mon, 11 Jun 2018 16:02:13 +0000

A roundup of the security news from June 4 – June 10, including IoT botnets, government attacks, dodgy Wi-Fi, and more.

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Apple's Health Record API released to third-party developers; is it safe?

Credit to Author: Lucas Mearian| Date: Thu, 07 Jun 2018 03:11:00 -0700

Apple at its Worldwide Developers Conference this week released an API that allows  developers and researchers to create applications that connect to Health Records, a feature released with iOS 11.3 that allows patients to port their electronic health info to mobile devices and share data between care providers.

While the move promises to streamline the sharing of healthcare data, it also could open the door to that highly sensitive data falling into the wrong hands.

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Mobile Menace Monday: A race to hidden ads

Credit to Author: Nathan Collier| Date: Mon, 04 Jun 2018 15:00:00 +0000

A bike racing game on Google Play locks users’ screens, displays full-screen ads, and is notoriously difficult to uninstall. It’s no wonder Android game reviewers demand to know how to get rid of it. We show you how.

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How to use Apple’s Messages in iCloud for iOS, Mac

Credit to Author: Jonny Evans| Date: Wed, 30 May 2018 05:30:00 -0700

Along with key HomePod improvements, Apple also introduced Messages in iCloud with iOS 11.4. It’s a useful feature designed to store your Messages and attachments in iCloud, but enterprise users should think twice before enabling it.

Security is everything

I’m not saying iCloud is not secure – so long as you use a six-or more digit passcode or (better, but more awkward) an alphanumeric passcode, it’s highly secure. I’m reasonably confident a strong password, Apple’s own systems and its insistence you use two-factor authentication is enough for most of us.

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WWDC: Apple’s NFC plan is a big developer opportunity

Credit to Author: Jonny Evans| Date: Tue, 29 May 2018 08:01:00 -0700

Apple will open up fresh opportunities for developers as it extends Near Field Communications (NFC) support in iOS to more uses.

NFC: Apple’s story so far

Apple introduced support for a new NFC framework called Core NFC at WWDC 2017. Developers were pleased, but the implementations were rather limited.

Core NFC let developers build apps that read NFC tags, but only for things like visitor attractions and museum exhibitions.

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Amazon's Echo privacy flub has big implications for IT

Credit to Author: Evan Schuman| Date: Sat, 26 May 2018 08:34:00 -0700

Amazon has confirmed a report that one of its Echo devices recorded a family’s conversation and then messaged it to a random person on the family’s contact list, who is an employee of a family member.

But Amazon, in a statement emailed to Computerworld, confirmed every privacy advocate’s worst nightmare with its explanation: “Echo woke up due to a word in background conversation sounding like ‘Alexa.’ Then, the subsequent conversation was heard as a ‘send message’ request. At which point, Alexa said out loud ‘To whom?’ At which point, the background conversation was interpreted as a name in the customer’s contact list. Alexa then asked out loud, ‘[contact name], right?’ Alexa then interpreted background conversation as ‘right.’ As unlikely as this string of events is, we are evaluating options to make this case even less likely.”

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Easy mobile security the Faraday way

Credit to Author: Mike Elgan| Date: Sat, 19 May 2018 03:00:00 -0700

Have you heard about those special bags, cases and wallets that protect your electronics from hack attacks?

It’s a signal-blocking container, basically a tinfoil hat for your gadget.

Tinfoil hats are associated with conspiracy theorists concerned about secret government mind-control programs. But when it comes to your wireless gadgets, they really are out to get you.

For example: It’s not a conspiracy theory to believe that companies you’ve never heard of are tracking your location.

In the past two weeks, we’ve learned that a company called Securus Technologies sold the real-time location data of millions of people. It got this data from another company called LocationSmart, which itself was buying the data from AT&T, Sprint, T-Mobile and Verizon.

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