Mozilla takes first step in pulling Firefox plug on macOS Mavericks, Yosemite and El Capitan

Credit to Author: Gregg Keizer| Date: Wed, 24 Jun 2020 13:45:00 -0700

Mozilla this week announced it would automatically move users running outdated versions of macOS to the Firefox Extended Support Release (ESR), an edition that provides security updates only.

The move, a first step towards dropping all support, will take place June 30, when Mozilla releases Firefox 78. On that date, users of Firefox still running OS X 10.9 (Mavericks), 10.10 (Yosemite) and 10.11 (El Capitan) on their Macs will instead be shunted to the extended channel and given 78.0 ESR. While that and Firefox 78 will be identical, when the latter shifts to version 79 four weeks later, ERS will remain at 78, increased to 78.1 to mark its first security update.

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Chrome to target abusive notification requests beginning in July

Credit to Author: Gregg Keizer| Date: Fri, 12 Jun 2020 11:54:00 -0700

Chrome next month will begin to block notifications from sites that Google believes misuse or abuse the privilege of issuing the warnings.

Starting with Chrome 84 – scheduled to release July 14 – sites that Google thinks traffic in notifications meant to trick users will be blacklisted. Such sites’ notifications will be scaled back to what Google earlier defined as its “Quiet UI” and a Chrome-produced warning will appear telling the user that the website may be trying to dupe him or her into accepting future notices.

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Getting started with Google Password Manager

Credit to Author: JR Raphael| Date: Fri, 29 May 2020 03:00:00 -0700

If you’re still trying to remember all of your passwords and then type ’em into sites by hand, let me tell you: You’re doing it wrong.

With all the credentials we have to keep track of these days, there’s just no way the human brain can handle the task of storing the specifics — at least, not if you’re using complex, unique passwords that aren’t repeated (or almost repeated, even) from one site to the next. That’s where a password manager comes into play: It securely stores all your sign-in info for you and then fills it in as needed.

While there’s a case to be made for leaning on a dedicated app for that purpose (for reasons we’ll discuss further in a moment), Google has its own password management system built right into Chrome. And it’s far better to rely on that than to use nothing at all.

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Vivaldi joins anti-tracking browser brotherhood

Credit to Author: Gregg Keizer| Date: Thu, 23 Apr 2020 03:00:00 -0700

Niche browser maker Vivaldi Technologies this week released version 3.0 of its eponymous application, which included integrated ad- and tracker-blockers.

Both tools were disabled by default in the new version, which was released Wednesday. “We believe that many users would not wish to prevent the sites they like to visit from generating revenue, and for that reason, we don’t enable Ad blocker by default,” wrote Jon von Tetzchner, co-founder and CEO of Vivaldi, in a post to a company blog.

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Browser makers cite coronavirus, restore support for obsolete TLS 1.0 and 1.1 encryption

Credit to Author: Gregg Keizer| Date: Fri, 03 Apr 2020 13:17:00 -0700

Google, Microsoft and Mozilla have each issued reprieves to Transport Layer Security (TLS) 1.0 and 1.1, aged encryption protocols that were to be bounced from browser support in March, because of the COVID-19 pandemic.

By common agreement, Google’s Chrome, Microsoft’s Internet Explorer (IE) and Edge, and Mozilla’s Firefox were to disable support for TLS 1.0 and 1.1 early in 2020. They, along with Apple – which produces Safari – announced the move a year and a half ago, noting then that the protocols had been made obsolete by TLS 1.2 and 1.3.

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