WOOF locker: Unmasking the browser locker behind a stealthy tech support scam operation

Credit to Author: Jérôme Segura| Date: Wed, 22 Jan 2020 16:00:00 +0000

We reveal the inner workings of WOOF locker, the most sophisticated browser locker campaign we’ve seen to date. Learn how this tech support scam evades researchers and ensnares users by hiding in plain sight.

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A week in security (October 7 – 13)

Credit to Author: Malwarebytes Labs| Date: Mon, 14 Oct 2019 15:30:38 +0000

A look at the cybersecurity news from October 7 – 13, including updates on war shipping, managed service providers, and stalkerware.

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A Chrome security setting you shouldn't overlook

Credit to Author: JR Raphael| Date: Thu, 10 Oct 2019 09:09:00 -0700

We spend tons o’ time talking about Android security settings — like the added Android 10 option to limit how and when apps are able to access your location. Often lost in the shuffle, though, is the fact that the Chrome desktop browser has some significant security options of its own, and they’re just as critical to consider.

In fact, Chrome has an easily overlooked setting that’s somewhat similar to that new location control feature in Android. It’s attached to every Chrome extension you install, as of not that long ago, and it lets you decide exactly when an extension should be able to see what you’re doing on the web and be made privy to all the details (yes, even those details) of your browsing activity.

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Google launches leaked-password checker, will bake it into Chrome in December

Credit to Author: Gregg Keizer| Date: Fri, 04 Oct 2019 04:06:00 -0700

Google has launched a web-based hacked-password checker, part of its efforts to bake an alert system into Chrome.

Called “Password Checker,” the service examines the username-password combinations stored in Chrome’s own password manager and reports back on those authentication pairings that have been exposed in publicly-known data breaches.

The web version can be found at passwords.google.com<>, the umbrella site for Chrome users who run the browser after logging in with their Google account, then use that to synchronize data – including passwords – between copies of Chrome on different devices.

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