For February, a 'bumpy' Patch Tuesday ride

Credit to Author: Susan Bradley| Date: Mon, 15 Feb 2021 04:31:00 -0800

One week out from Patch Tuesday and it’s been a bumpy release for the month, especially for older versions of Windows 10 and Server 2016. (Less affected: the consumer versions of Windows 10 2004 and 20H2.)

Windows Server 2016/1607 suffered the worst of the issues: the original version of the Servicing Stack update KB4601392 caused patching to get “stuck.” Server patchers had to jump through a ton of hoops to get the monthly security update installed. Microsoft pulled the bad update and replaced it with KB5001078. If you were unlucky and installed KB4601392 before it was pulled, Microsoft has this  guidance to manually reset Windows updates components.

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Meet the Microsoft Pluton processor – The security chip designed for the future of Windows PCs

Credit to Author: Eric Avena| Date: Tue, 17 Nov 2020 14:00:02 +0000

In collaboration with leading silicon partners AMD, Intel, and Qualcomm Technologies, Inc., we are announcing the Microsoft Pluton security processor. This chip-to-cloud security technology, pioneered in Xbox and Azure Sphere, will bring even more security advancements to future Windows PCs and signals the beginning of a journey with ecosystem and OEM partners.

The post Meet the Microsoft Pluton processor – The security chip designed for the future of Windows PCs appeared first on Microsoft Security.

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Quick Heal Supports Windows 10 October 2020 Update

Credit to Author: Quickheal| Date: Mon, 19 Oct 2020 10:24:30 +0000

Microsoft has recently come up with a new update for Windows 10 PCs – Windows 10 October 2020 Update (Build version 20H2) Here are some of the highlights of this update and its compatibility with Quick Heal. Few Highlights of Windows 10 October 2020 Update An updated version of the…

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Windows 7 is EOL: What next?

Credit to Author: Pieter Arntz| Date: Tue, 24 Mar 2020 17:37:08 +0000

Windows 7 is EOL, meaning it’s reached the end of its lifecycle. It’s time to move on to a more secure OS—but that doesn’t mean you no longer need security software.

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The post Windows 7 is EOL: What next? appeared first on Malwarebytes Labs.

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Patch Tuesday, January 2020 Edition

Credit to Author: BrianKrebs| Date: Wed, 15 Jan 2020 02:31:50 +0000

Microsoft today released updates to plug 50 security holes in various flavors of Windows and related software. The patch batch includes a fix for a flaw in Windows 10 and server equivalents of this operating system that prompted an unprecedented public warning from the U.S. National Security Agency. This month also marks the end of mainstream support for Windows 7, a still broadly-used operating system that will no longer be supplied with security updates.

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Going in-depth on the Windows 10 random number generation infrastructure

Credit to Author: Eric Avena| Date: Mon, 25 Nov 2019 19:00:33 +0000

We are happy to release to the public The Windows 10 random number generation infrastructure white paper, which provides details about the Windows 10 pseudo-random number generator (PRNG) infrastructure, and lists the primary RNG APIs. The whitepaper also explains how the entropy system works, what the entropy sources are, and how initial seeding works.

The post Going in-depth on the Windows 10 random number generation infrastructure appeared first on Microsoft Security.

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New browser extensions for integrating Microsoft’s hardware-based isolation

Credit to Author: Eric Avena| Date: Thu, 23 May 2019 15:50:07 +0000

The hardware-based isolation technology on Windows 10 that allows Microsoft Edge to isolate browser-based attacks is now available as a browser extension for Google Chrome and Mozilla Firefox. We introduced the container technology in 2017. Since then, we have been evolving the technology and engaging with customers to understand how hardware-based isolation can best help…

The post New browser extensions for integrating Microsoft’s hardware-based isolation appeared first on Microsoft Security.

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