The future of security: smarter devices that protect themselves

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Why Macs and iPhones should avoid installing 'orphan' apps

There are many reasons any business with a connected fleet of tech products needs robust security policies in place. But the need to protect the enterprise against vulnerabilities inherited with third-party software must be among the biggest motivators. While I shouldn’t need to convince Computerworld readers to keep things locked down, I want to reprise two recent reports to reinforce the warning.

Half of all macOS malware comes from one app

Elastic Security Labs (via 9to5Mac) recently estimated that half of all macOS malware is installed as a result of poor management of the MacKeeper utility app. The report said almost 50% of Mac malware arrives through its installation.

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Mosyle brings new iPhone, iPad endpoint security options

Mosyle is ramping up its wares with new security protections for iPhones and iPad adding more fuel to the Apple-in-the-enterprise fire.

Hardening and compliance options for iPhones and iPads

The company is unveiling its first endpoint security solution for IT admins overseeing fleets of mobile Apple devices. The idea is that the product, Mosyle Hardening and Compliance, ensures that employee devices are protected, compliant, and following the latest cybersecurity benchmarks.

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Do you really know what’s inside your iOS and Android apps?

It’s time to audit your code, as it appears that some no/low code features used in iOS or Android apps may not be as secure as you thought. That’s the big take away from a report explaining that disguised Russian software is being used in apps from the US Army, CDC, the UK Labour party, and other entities.

When Washington becomes Siberia

What’s at issue is that code developed by a company called Pushwoosh has been deployed within thousands of apps from thousands of entities. These include the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), which claims it was led to believe Pushwoosh was based in Washington when the developer is, in fact, based in Siberia, Reuters explains. A visit to the Pushwoosh Twitter feed shows the company claiming to be based in Washington, DC.

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Battle with Bots Prompts Mass Purge of Amazon, Apple Employee Accounts on LinkedIn

Credit to Author: BrianKrebs| Date: Thu, 20 Oct 2022 17:07:34 +0000

On October 10, 2022, there were 576,562 LinkedIn accounts that listed their current employer as Apple Inc. The next day, half of those profiles no longer existed. A similarly dramatic drop in the number of LinkedIn profiles claiming employment at Amazon comes as LinkedIn is struggling to combat a significant uptick in the creation of fake employee accounts that pair AI-generated profile photos with text lifted from legitimate users.

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Update now! October patch Tuesday fixes actively used zero-day…but not the one you expected

Categories: Exploits and vulnerabilities

Categories: News

Tags: Microsoft

Tags: Apple

Tags: Google

Tags: Android

Tags: Samsung

Tags: Xiaomi

Tags: Adobe

Tags: SAP

Tags: VMWare

Tags: Fortinet

Tags: CVE-2022-41033

Tags: CVE-2022-41040

Tags: zero-day

No fix for ProxyNotShell

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The post Update now! October patch Tuesday fixes actively used zero-day…but not the one you expected appeared first on Malwarebytes Labs.

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How Ukraine’s MacPaw got its business ready for war

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