Feds may already have found a way to hack into Apple iPhones

Credit to Author: Lucas Mearian| Date: Thu, 16 Jan 2020 14:05:00 -0800

After Apple turned down a request by U.S. Attorney General William Barr this week to unlock two iPhones used by a terrorist suspect in a recent deadly shooting, the FBI appears to already have the tools needed to access the smartphones.

Apple turned down a request from U.S. Attorney General William Barr saying it would  not help unlock two iPhones used by the shooter, 21-year-old Mohammed Saeed Alshamrani. He is believed to have acted alone when he shot and killed three service members and wounded several others at the Naval Air Station in Pensacola, Fla. last month.

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Breaking iPhone encryption won't make anyone safer

Credit to Author: Jonny Evans| Date: Wed, 15 Jan 2020 05:06:00 -0800

Imagine all your tax documentation could be examined by officials from any government merely on suspicion. That’s the future some governments are pushing for when they demand Apple puts security backdoors into its products.

Making no one safe

Think about the nature of security backdoors:

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Apple refuses latest government iPhone-unlock request

Credit to Author: Lucas Mearian| Date: Tue, 14 Jan 2020 12:30:00 -0800

Apple turned down a request from U.S. Attorney General William Barr this week,  saying it will not help unlock two iPhones used by a terrorist suspect last month in the deadly shooting at the Naval Air Station in Pensacola, Fla.

Barr said the shooter, 21-year-old Mohammed Saeed Alshamrani, acted alone when he shot and killed three service members and wounded several others, including two sheriff’s deputies responding to the attack. Alshamrani, a member of the Saudi Air Force and an aviation student at the base, was shot dead on the scene by police.

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El extorsionista de “volcado de datos” de iCloud evita la prisión

Credit to Author: Naked Security| Date: Thu, 02 Jan 2020 09:14:30 +0000

El londinense que intentó extorsionar 100.000 $ a Apple amenazando con volcar datos de millones de cuentas de iCloud y luego cerrarlas, ha recibido una sentencia por la que puede evitar ir a la cárcel. Kerem Albayrak, de 22 años, del norte de Londres, terminó declarándose culpable de tres delitos: un cargo de chantaje y [&#8230;]<img src=”http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/sophos/dgdY/~4/x2MRPaj1B_o” height=”1″ width=”1″ alt=””/>

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Apple wants privacy laws to protect its users

Credit to Author: Jonny Evans| Date: Wed, 08 Jan 2020 06:54:00 -0800

Your iPhone (like most smartphones) knows when it is picked up, what you do with it, who you call, where you go, who you know – and a bunch more personal information, too.

The snag with your device knowing all this information is that once the data is understood, that information can be shared or even used against you.

Information is power

Jane Horvath, Apple’s senior director for global privacy, appeared at CES 2020 this week to discuss the company’s approach to smartphone security. She stressed the company’s opposition to the creation of software backdoors into devices, and also said:

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Apple’s wants privacy laws to protect its users

Credit to Author: Jonny Evans| Date: Wed, 08 Jan 2020 06:54:00 -0800

Your iPhone (like most smartphones) knows when it is picked up, what you do with it, who you call, where you go, who you know – and a bunch more personal information, too.

Information is power

The snag with your device knowing all this information is that once the data is understood than that information can be shared or even used against you.

Jane Horvath, Apple’s senior director for global privacy, appeared at CES 2012 to discuss the company’s approach to smartphone security.

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Ultra Wideband (UWB) explained (and why it’s in the iPhone 11)

Credit to Author: Lucas Mearian| Date: Tue, 31 Dec 2019 03:00:00 -0800

One of the new chips in this year’s crop of iPhones is the U1; it provides Ultra Wideband (UWB) connectivity that, in conjunction with Internet of Things (IoT) technology, could offer a myriad of new services for enterprises and consumers.

As Apple puts it, UWB technology offers “spatial awareness” – the ability for your phone to recognize its surroundings and the objects in it. Essentially, one iPhone 11 user can point his or her phone at another and transfer a file or photo.

While the technology isn’t new, Apple’s implementation marks the first time UWB has been used in a modern smartphone.

What is Ultra Wideband?

UWB is a short-range, wireless communication protocol that – like Bluetooth or Wi-Fi – uses radio waves. But it differs substantially in that IT operates at a very high frequency. As its name denotes, it also uses a wide spectrum of several GHz. One way to think of it is as a radar that can continuously scan an entire room and precisely lock onto an object like a laser beam to discover its location and communicate data.

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