Stalkerware advertising ban by Google a welcome, if incomplete, step

Credit to Author: David Ruiz| Date: Tue, 14 Jul 2020 16:03:43 +0000

Google will no longer allow advertising of stalkerware and spyware tools, but a written exception could allow some companies to skirt the rules.

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A week in security (June 22 – 28)

Credit to Author: Malwarebytes Labs| Date: Mon, 29 Jun 2020 16:25:48 +0000

A roundup of cybersecurity news from June 22 – 28, inlcuding a zero day guide, tax season tips, and web skimmers using image files.

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Android 11's most important additions

Credit to Author: JR Raphael| Date: Thu, 11 Jun 2020 04:00:00 -0700

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Getting started with Google Password Manager

Credit to Author: JR Raphael| Date: Fri, 29 May 2020 03:00:00 -0700

If you’re still trying to remember all of your passwords and then type ’em into sites by hand, let me tell you: You’re doing it wrong.

With all the credentials we have to keep track of these days, there’s just no way the human brain can handle the task of storing the specifics — at least, not if you’re using complex, unique passwords that aren’t repeated (or almost repeated, even) from one site to the next. That’s where a password manager comes into play: It securely stores all your sign-in info for you and then fills it in as needed.

While there’s a case to be made for leaning on a dedicated app for that purpose (for reasons we’ll discuss further in a moment), Google has its own password management system built right into Chrome. And it’s far better to rely on that than to use nothing at all.

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UK Ad Campaign Seeks to Deter Cybercrime

Credit to Author: BrianKrebs| Date: Thu, 28 May 2020 16:19:30 +0000

The United Kingdom’s anti-cybercrime agency is running online ads aimed at young people who search the Web for services that enable computer crimes, specifically trojan horse programs and DDoS-for-hire services. The ad campaign follows a similar initiative launched in late 2017 that academics say measurably dampened demand for such services by explaining that their use to harm others is illegal and can land potential customers in jail.

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