Windows 10 upgrades are rarely useful, say IT admins

Credit to Author: Gregg Keizer| Date: Thu, 17 Sep 2020 03:00:00 -0700

A majority of IT administrators polled this summer said that the twice-a-year Windows 10 feature upgrades are not useful – or rarely so – a stunning stance considering how much effort Microsoft puts into building the updates.

About 58% of nearly 500 business professionals who are responsible for servicing Windows at their workplaces said that Windows 10 feature upgrades – two annually, one each in the spring and fall – were either not useful (24%) or rarely useful (34%).

Only 20% contended that the upgrades were useful in some fashion, while a slightly larger chunk – 22% – choose a noncommittal neutral as a response, claiming that the operating system’s updates were neither useful nor not useful. (It might be best to consider this answer as undecided since in this binary world if something is not not useful, that must mean it is useful.)

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A fat Windows Update for September's Patch Tuesday

Credit to Author: Greg Lambert| Date: Fri, 11 Sep 2020 10:50:00 -0700

Microsoft has released 129 updates to its Windows ecosystem, but the good news  this month is that we are not responding to any zero-days or publicly reported vulnerabilities. Microsoft appears to be getting serious about removing Adobe Flash Player (a good thing) and we see a very broad update to Windows desktops and servers. Unusually, Microsoft’s browsers are not a huge focus this month, and both the Microsoft Office (excluding SharePoint) and development platform have received only a few, lower profile patches.

We have included a helpful infographic, which this month looks a little lopsided as all of the attention should be on Windows components.

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Beaucoup bugs beset this month’s Windows patches

Credit to Author: Woody Leonhard| Date: Thu, 10 Sep 2020 06:42:00 -0700

Someday, you’ll tell your grandkids about the halcyon days of July and August 2020, when Microsoft took pity on us poor patching souls and introduced few bugs in its stew of Patch Tuesday patches.

Now, it looks like we’re well on our way to another mess.

Although it’s still too early to throw up your hands and peremptorily pass on the September crop, I assure you that there is no joy in Patchville.

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Yes, you can install the August Windows and Office patches now

Credit to Author: Woody Leonhard| Date: Fri, 04 Sep 2020 09:04:00 -0700

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Microsoft Patch Alert: August 2020

Credit to Author: Woody Leonhard| Date: Mon, 31 Aug 2020 17:23:00 -0700

With Windows 10 2004 gradually creeping (I use the term intentionally) onto more machines, faults and foibles are coming out of the woodwork. It looks like a fix for the long-lamented version 2004 defrag bugs is on the way, but we aren’t there yet. Lenovo isn’t too happy with the August version 2004 cumulative update. It’s still too early to move to 2004, in my opinion — and those problems ensure I’ll keep 2004 off my machines for a while.

Meanwhile, Microsoft extended the end of support date for Win10 version 1803 — a move that’ll interest exactly nobody except for admins with aging Win10 machines. Windows 8.1 patchers got left out in the Remote Access cold for a week. The .NET security updates have an odd, acknowledged bug with a manual registry workaround.

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Microsoft adds 6 months support to Windows 10 1803, again cites pandemic

Credit to Author: Gregg Keizer| Date: Wed, 26 Aug 2020 14:10:00 -0700

Microsoft on Wednesday stretched support for a third version of Windows 10, again citing the coronavirus pandemic and its impact on business.

The Redmond, Wash. developer extended security support for Windows 10 Enterprise 1803 and Windows 10 Education 1803 by six months, to May 11, 2021. The original end-of-support date was to be Nov. 10.

“We have heard your feedback and understand your need to focus on business continuity in the midst of the global pandemic,” Chris Morrissey, who leads the communications team for Windows’ servicing group, wrote in a post to a company blog. “As a result, we have decided to delay the scheduled end-of-service date for the Enterprise, Education, and IoT Enterprise editions of Windows 10, version 1803.”

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