Investment Scammer John Davies Reinvents Himself?

Credit to Author: BrianKrebs| Date: Fri, 07 May 2021 13:15:27 +0000

John Bernard, a pseudonym used by a convicted thief and con artist named John Clifton Davies who’s fleeced dozens of technology startups out of an estimated $30 million, appears to have reinvented himself again after being exposed in a recent investigative series published here. Sources tell KrebsOnSecurity that Davies/Bernard is now posing as John Cavendish and head of a new “private office” called Hempton Business Management LLP.

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Malicious Office 365 Apps Are the Ultimate Insiders

Credit to Author: BrianKrebs| Date: Wed, 05 May 2021 12:27:50 +0000

Phishers targeting Microsoft Office 365 users increasingly are turning to specialized links that take users to their organization’s own email login page. After a user logs in, the link prompts them to install a malicious but innocuously-named app that gives the attacker persistent, password-free access to any of the user’s emails and files, both of which are then plundered to launch malware and phishing scams against others.

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Getting passwords right for you and your business

Credit to Author: Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols| Date: Tue, 04 May 2021 04:00:00 -0700

Chances are you’ve never heard of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Special Publication 800-63, Appendix A. But you’ve been using its contents from your first online account and password until today. That’s because, within it, you’ll find the first password rules such as requiring a combination of a lowercase and uppercase letter, a number, and a special character — and the recommendation of changing your password every 90 days.

There’s only one problem. Bill Burr, who originally set up these rules, thinks he blew it. “Much of what I did I now regret,” Burr told the The Wall Street Journal a few years ago.

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For Windows, it’s ‘squirrel away time’

Credit to Author: Susan Bradley| Date: Mon, 03 May 2021 04:51:00 -0700

It’s that semi-annual time of the year we in AskWoody land call “squirrel away time” — time to make sure you have a copy of the ISO currently installed on your computer in case you need to reinstall it. There are a number of ways to get older versions of Windows by using a trick publicized on the Thurrott.com site. But the easiest way to grab a copy of, say, 20H2 is to go to the software download site, download a copy and store it on a spare hard drive, flash drive or external USB drive.

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Task Force Seeks to Disrupt Ransomware Payments

Credit to Author: BrianKrebs| Date: Thu, 29 Apr 2021 12:26:09 +0000

Some of the world’s top tech firms are backing a new industry task force focused on disrupting cybercriminal ransomware gangs by limiting their ability to get paid, and targeting the individuals and finances of the organized thieves behind these crimes.

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A highly sarcastic Android security warning

Credit to Author: JR Raphael| Date: Thu, 29 Apr 2021 06:38:00 -0700

Holy floppin’ hellfire, Henry! Have you heard? A terrifying new form of Android malware is running amok — stealing passwords, emptying bank accounts, and drinking all the grape soda from the refrigerators of unsuspecting Android phone owners.

We should all be quivering in our rainboots, according to almost all the information I’ve read on these here internets. Numerous adjective-filled news stories have warned me that the “scary new Android malware” is “spreading quickly,” targeting “millions” (millions!) of users, and occasionally even “kicking people square in the groin.” (All right, so I made that last part up. But you get the idea.)

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Experian API Exposed Credit Scores of Most Americans

Credit to Author: BrianKrebs| Date: Wed, 28 Apr 2021 20:47:02 +0000

Big-three consumer credit bureau Experian just fixed a weakness with a partner website that let anyone look up the credit score of tens of millions of Americans just by supplying their name and mailing address, KrebsOnSecurity has learned. Experian says it has plugged the data leak, but the researcher who reported the finding says he fears the same weakness may be present at countless other lending websites that work with the credit bureau.

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