How to give your phone an Android-12-inspired privacy upgrade

Credit to Author: JR Raphael| Date: Thu, 29 Jul 2021 07:04:00 -0700

Android 12 sure is an onion of an update, wouldn’t ya say?

Now, don’t get me wrong: I’m not suggesting it’s fragrant, likely to make you cry, or positively delicious when cooked in a stir-fry. (That’d be one heck of a piece of software!) I just mean that it has lots of layers to it, including some that are beneath the surface and impossible to see when you’re only glancing from afar.

Android 12 is full of changes both big and small, in fact — and while many of its most noticeable external elements will be limited to Google’s own Pixel phones, some of the improvements tucked away in those sticky lower layers are arguably the most important changes of all.

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Acronis teams with Jamf to secure the Apple-centric enterprise

Credit to Author: Jonny Evans| Date: Mon, 26 Jul 2021 09:16:00 -0700

As the Mac security journey becomes ever more challenging, there’s fresh activity in the Mac security and enterprise infrastructure space: Acronis Cyber Protect Cloud now integrates with leading enterprise management platform Jamf.

Acronis and Jamf: Better together

That’s a significant step forward in terms of better native Mac support from Acronis, which has been working to widen its support for Apple’s platform since at least 2014 when it introduced Mac support for Acronis Access. It’s also a significant indicator that despite the existence of a few hold-outs, most enterprises now recognize that the future of work is remote.

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About the Pegasus spyware, Apple's telling the full truth

Credit to Author: Evan Schuman| Date: Mon, 26 Jul 2021 03:48:00 -0700

When it comes to security and privacy issues, Apple generally does a far better job than its rivals — though admittedly for selfish marketing reasons. When comparing Apple’s iOS and Google’s Android, it’s hard to not see that at least Apple makes a good-faith attempt at being security- and privacy-oriented, compared to Google, which would prefer selling ads and anything else it can think of.

Still, Apple has been known to twist and shift the truth, omitting germane background info and context when it’s convenient. Remember antenna-gate? The battery-gate brouhaha?

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Pegasus spyware and iPhone security


Amnesty International's Security Lab revealed that a handful of iPhones, mostly belonging to journalists and human rights activists, were successfully infected with Pegasus spyware. While the majority of iPhones users are not affected, the spyware, created by NSO Group, was found even on newer iPhone models equipped with the latest iOS update. Apple bills the iPhone as the most secure consumer cellular product on the market, so this wave of malware raises security concerns. Computerworld Executive Editor Ken Mingis and Macworld Executive Editor Michael Simon join Juliet to discuss iPhone security and more.

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Scary ‘malware-as-a-service’ Mac attack discovered

Credit to Author: Jonny Evans| Date: Thu, 22 Jul 2021 06:16:00 -0700

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iPhone spyware: It's a dirty job, but NSO's gonna do it

Credit to Author: Jonny Evans| Date: Mon, 19 Jul 2021 08:59:00 -0700

Amnesty International has revealed that NSO Group, an Israeli ‘surveillance as a service’ company, has created and sold a nasty iMessage attack that can be used to spy on journalists, activists, and political representatives using their iPhones.

A zero-click hack attack

What makes this latest attack particularly dangerous is its exploitation of zero-click vulnerabilities, meaning targets don’t even need to read or open the iMessage carrying the hack. Amnesty says all iPhones and iOS updates are vulnerable to the exploit, which gives attackers “complete access to the device’s messages, emails, media, microphone, camera, calls and contacts.”

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In the fight against ransomware, Microsoft must do more

Credit to Author: Susan Bradley| Date: Mon, 19 Jul 2021 06:24:00 -0700

Not a day goes by that I don’t hear about some business or consultant affected by ransomware. Often, the incident starts with a phishing attack or from a vulnerability introduced by delayed patching. Or it could be a consultant tool that should have been coded better. Regardless of how it began, if you attempt to recover from a backup (assuming you have a viable one on hand) or pay the ransom and attempt to unencrypt your data, recovery will take time.

That’s time companies often don’t have.

Last week, the US government set up the Stopransomware website to help businesses, schools, and other organizations deal with ransomware attacks. Included in the guidance are recommendations regarding backing up:

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A big July Patch Tuesday — and the ongoing print nightmare

Credit to Author: Greg Lambert| Date: Sat, 17 Jul 2021 05:46:00 -0700

This week’s Patch Tuesday release from Microsoft is a big one for the Windows ecosystem; it includes 117 patches that handle four publicly reported and four exploited vulnerabilities. The good news: this month’s Microsoft Office and development platform (Visual Studio) patches are relatively straightforward and can be added with minimal risk to your standard patch release schedules, and there are no browser updates. Alas, we have a really serious printer issue (CVE-2021-34527) that was released out of bounds (OOB) and has been updated at least twice in the past few days. That means you need to pay immediate attention to the Windows updates and that you add all of the Windows desktop patches to your “Patch Now” schedule. 

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