The AI data-poisoning cat-and-mouse game — this time, IT will win

Credit to Author: eschuman@thecontentfirm.com| Date: Mon, 12 Feb 2024 03:00:00 -0800

The IT community of late has been freaking out about AI data poisoning. For some, it’s a sneaky mechanism that could act as a backdoor into enterprise systems by  surreptitiously infecting the data large language models (LLMs) train on and then getting  pulled into enterprise systems. For others, it’s a way to combat LLMs that try to do an end run around trademark and copyright protections.

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Zoom goes for a blatant genAI data grab; enterprises, beware (updated)

Credit to Author: eschuman@thecontentfirm.com| Date: Thu, 17 Aug 2023 07:06:00 -0700

When Zoom amended its terms of service earlier this month — a bid to make executives comfortable that it wouldn’t use Zoom data to train generative AI models — it quickly stirred up a hornet’s nest. So the company “revised” the terms of service, and left in place ways it can still get full access to user data.

Computerworld repeatedly reached out to Zoom without success to clarify what the changes really mean.

Editor’s note: Shortly after this column was published, Zoom again changed its terms and conditions. We’ve added an update to the end of the story covering the latest changes.

Before I delve into the legalese — and Zoom’s weasel words to falsely suggest it was not doing what it obviously was doing — let me raise a more critical question: Is there anyone in the video-call business not doing this? Microsoft? Google? Those are two firms that never met a dataset that they didn’t love.

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Zoom goes for a blatant genAI data grab; enterprises, beware

Credit to Author: eschuman@thecontentfirm.com| Date: Fri, 11 Aug 2023 11:21:00 -0700

When Zoom amended its terms of service earlier this month — a bid to make executives comfortable that it wouldn’t use Zoom data to train generative AI models — it quickly stirred up a hornet’s nest. So the company “revised” the terms of service, and left in place ways it can still get full access to user data.

(Computerworld repeatedly reached out to Zoom without success to clarify what the changes really mean.)

Before I delve into the legalese — and Zoom’s weasel words to falsely suggest it was not doing what it obviously was doing — let me raise a more critical question: Is there anyone in the video-call business not doing this? Microsoft? Google? Those are two firms that never met a dataset that they didn’t love.

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Q&A: TIAA's CIO touts top AI projects, details worker skills needed now

Artificial intelligence (AI) is already having a significant effect on businesses and organizations across a variety of industries, even as many businesses are still just kicking the tires on the technology.

Those that have fully adopted AI claim a 35% increase in innovation and a 33% increase in sustainability over the past three years, according to research firm IDC. Customer and employee retention has also been reported as improving by 32% after investing in AI.

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Why blocking ads is good for your digital health

Categories: Personal

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We take a look at why blocking adverts and tracking is one of the best things you can do to keep your devices healthy.

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The post Why blocking ads is good for your digital health appeared first on Malwarebytes Labs.

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Blackberry refreshes its UEM suite, focuses on zero-trust access

Credit to Author: Lucas Mearian| Date: Thu, 21 Nov 2019 10:17:00 -0800

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Why wearables, health records and clinical trials need a blockchain injection

Credit to Author: Lucas Mearian| Date: Mon, 29 Apr 2019 03:00:00 -0700

TORONTO – The opportunity exists in healthcare to hand over control of medical records to patients who can choose not only what info providers can see but what personal data gets added to records via wearables, genomics and even lifestyle choices.

And once patients begin accumulating more data about themselves in personal health records (PHRs), they can opt to anonymize that information and sell it to researchers, vastly expanding the pool of information available for clinical studies.

Because no data is as sensitive as a medical record, being able to assure its security and immutability through blockchain encryption represents a unique opportunity to “repatriate” and “monetize” that record for the patient, according to Dr. Eric Hoskins, chair of Canada’s Federal Advisory Council on the Implementation of National Pharmacare.

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