A week in security (May 10 – 16)

Credit to Author: Malwarebytes Labs| Date: Mon, 17 May 2021 09:47:49 +0000

A roundup of the previous week’s most interesting secrurity stories alongside the very best of our own research, from May 10 – 16.

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A highly sarcastic Android security warning

Credit to Author: JR Raphael| Date: Thu, 29 Apr 2021 06:38:00 -0700

Holy floppin’ hellfire, Henry! Have you heard? A terrifying new form of Android malware is running amok — stealing passwords, emptying bank accounts, and drinking all the grape soda from the refrigerators of unsuspecting Android phone owners.

We should all be quivering in our rainboots, according to almost all the information I’ve read on these here internets. Numerous adjective-filled news stories have warned me that the “scary new Android malware” is “spreading quickly,” targeting “millions” (millions!) of users, and occasionally even “kicking people square in the groin.” (All right, so I made that last part up. But you get the idea.)

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Watch out! Android Flubot spyware is spreading fast

Credit to Author: Pieter Arntz| Date: Wed, 28 Apr 2021 17:06:59 +0000

Notorious Android spyware Flubot is spreading via messages about missed deliveries.

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Details of how the feds broke into iPhones should shake up enterprise IT

Credit to Author: Evan Schuman| Date: Mon, 19 Apr 2021 03:18:00 -0700

Apple has an awkward history with security researchers: it wants to tout that its security is excellent, which means trying to silence those who aim to prove otherwise. But those attempts to fight security researchers who sell their information to anyone other than Apple undercuts the company’s security message.

A recent piece in The Washington Post spilled the details behind Apple’s legendary fight with the U.S. government in 2016, when the Justice Department pushed Apple to create a security backdoor related to the iPhone used by a terrorist in the San Bernardino shooting. Apple refused; the government pursued it in court. Then when the government found a security researcher who offered a way to bypass Apple security, the government abandoned its legal fight. The exploit worked and, anticlimactically, nothing of value to the government was found on the device.

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