How to read encrypted messages from ChatGPT and other AI chatbots | Kaspersky official blog

Credit to Author: Alanna Titterington| Date: Wed, 24 Apr 2024 11:27:49 +0000

Researchers have developed a method for reading messages intercepted from OpenAI ChatGPT, Microsoft Copilot, and other AI chatbots. We explain how it works.

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Cerber Ransomware Exposed: A Comprehensive Analysis of Advanced Tactics, Encryption, and Evasion

Credit to Author: Quickheal| Date: Wed, 13 Dec 2023 13:06:59 +0000

Cerber is a strain of ransomware that was first identified in early 2016. It is a type of…

The post Cerber Ransomware Exposed: A Comprehensive Analysis of Advanced Tactics, Encryption, and Evasion appeared first on Quick Heal Blog.

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UK's controversial online safety bill set to become law

Four years after it started life as a white paper, the UK government’s controversial Online Safety Bill has finally passed through Parliament and is set to become law in the coming weeks.

The  bill aims to keep websites and different types of internet-based services free of illegal and harmful material while defending freedom of expression. It applies to search engines; internet services that host user-generated content, such as social media platforms; online forums; some online games; and sites that publish or display pornographic content.

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A history of ransomware: How did it get this far?

Categories: News

Categories: Ransomware

Tags: history

Tags: ransomware

Tags: bulletproof hosting

Tags: cryptocurrency

Tags: encryption

Tags: fast internet

Tags: government protection

Tags: RaaS

Tags: LockBit

Tags: pentester tools

Tags: code

We tell you about the origin of ransomware and what factors contributed to making it the most feared type of malware.

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The post A history of ransomware: How did it get this far? appeared first on Malwarebytes Labs.

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UK rolls back controversial encryption rules of Online Safety Bill

The UK government has conceded one of the more controversial parts of its Online Safety Bill, stating that the powers granted by the legislation will not be used to scan encrypted messaging apps for harmful content until it can be done in a targeted manner.

Companies will not be required to scan encrypted messages until it is “technically feasible and where technology has been accredited as meeting minimum standards of accuracy in detecting only child sexual abuse and exploitation content,” said Stephen Parkinson, the Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Arts and Heritage, in a planned statement during the bill’s third reading in the House of Lords on Wednesday afternoon.

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