Adventures in Contacting the Russian FSB

Credit to Author: BrianKrebs| Date: Mon, 07 Jun 2021 13:35:06 +0000

KrebsOnSecurity recently had occasion to contact the Russian Federal Security Service (FSB), the Russian equivalent of the U.S. Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI). In the process of doing so, I encountered a small snag: The FSB’s website said in order to contact them securely, I needed to download and install an encryption and virtual private networking (VPN) appliance that is flagged by at least 20 antivirus products as malware. The reason I contacted the FSB — one of the successor agencies to the Russian KGB — ironically enough had to do with security concerns raised about the FSB’s own preferred method of being contacted.

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VMware Flaw a Vector in SolarWinds Breach?

Credit to Author: BrianKrebs| Date: Fri, 18 Dec 2020 18:33:13 +0000

U.S. government cybersecurity agencies warned this week that the attackers behind the widespread hacking spree stemming from the compromise at network software firm SolarWinds used weaknesses in other, non-SolarWinds products to attack high-value targets. According to sources, among those was a flaw in software virtualization platform VMware, which the U.S. National Security Agency (NSA) warned on Dec. 7 was being used by Russian hackers to impersonate authorized users on victim networks.

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Russians Shut Down Huge Card Fraud Ring

Credit to Author: BrianKrebs| Date: Thu, 26 Mar 2020 17:28:07 +0000

Federal investigators in Russia have charged at least 25 people accused of operating a sprawling international credit card theft ring. Cybersecurity experts say the raid included the charging of a major carding kingpin thought to be tied to dozens of carding shops and to some of the bigger data breaches targeting western retailers over the past decade. In a statement released this week, the Russian Federal Security Service (FSB) said 25 individuals were charged with circulating illegal means of payment in connection with some 90 websites that sold stolen credit card data.

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FSB hackers drop files online

Credit to Author: Danny Bradbury| Date: Tue, 23 Jul 2019 09:48:59 +0000

A hacking group that distributed files stolen from a Russian contractor to the media last week has published some of the documents online.<img src=”http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/nakedsecurity/~4/nkr8ZrG8j1s” height=”1″ width=”1″ alt=””/>

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The Backstory Behind Carder Kingpin Roman Seleznev’s Record 27 Year Prison Sentence

Credit to Author: BrianKrebs| Date: Mon, 24 Apr 2017 16:37:23 +0000

Roman Seleznev, a 32-year-old Russian cybercriminal and prolific credit card thief, was sentenced Friday to 27 years in federal prison. That is a record punishment for hacking violations in the United States and by all accounts one designed to send a message to criminal hackers everywhere. But a close review of the case suggests that Seleznev’s record sentence was severe in large part because the evidence against him was substantial and yet he declined to cooperate with prosecutors prior to his trial. The son of an influential Russian politician, Seleznev made international headlines in 2014 after he was captured while vacationing in The Maldives, a popular vacation spot for Russians and one that many Russian cybercriminals previously considered to be out of reach for western law enforcement agencies. He was whisked away to Guam briefly before being transported to Washington state to stand trial for computer hacking charges.

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A Shakeup in Russia’s Top Cybercrime Unit


A chief criticism I heard from readers of my book, Spam Nation: The Inside Story of Organized Cybercrime, was that it dealt primarily with petty crooks involved in petty crimes, while ignoring more substantive security issues like government surveillance and cyber war. But now it appears that the chief antagonist of Spam Nation is at the dead center of an international scandal involving the hacking of U.S. state electoral boards in Arizona and Illinois, the sacking of Russia’s top cybercrime investigators, and the slow but steady leak of unflattering data on some of Russia’s most powerful politicians.

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