A highly sarcastic Android security warning

Credit to Author: JR Raphael| Date: Thu, 29 Apr 2021 06:38:00 -0700

Holy floppin’ hellfire, Henry! Have you heard? A terrifying new form of Android malware is running amok — stealing passwords, emptying bank accounts, and drinking all the grape soda from the refrigerators of unsuspecting Android phone owners.

We should all be quivering in our rainboots, according to almost all the information I’ve read on these here internets. Numerous adjective-filled news stories have warned me that the “scary new Android malware” is “spreading quickly,” targeting “millions” (millions!) of users, and occasionally even “kicking people square in the groin.” (All right, so I made that last part up. But you get the idea.)

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How long until Apple boots apps from its stores for privacy issues?

Credit to Author: Jonny Evans| Date: Wed, 28 Apr 2021 09:13:00 -0700

Apple will inevitably begin enforcing the privacy requirements it has put in place across its ecosystem, meaning developers who attempt to avoid or dissemble their way around these protections should expect action, including removal from the App Store.

What Apple is doing

Everyone recognizes how seriously Apple takes privacy. Statement by statement and all through iterative software and product releases, the company is making it crystal clear that it believes privacy is essential to achieve the potential of digital transformation.

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Rethinking mobile security in a post-COVID workplace

Credit to Author: Evan Schuman| Date: Mon, 26 Apr 2021 06:10:00 -0700

In the world of enterprise mobile security, sometimes horrible situations force security corner-cutting to preserve the company. And COVID-19 forcing companies to empty office buildings and move everything (and everyone) to remote locations and the cloud in March 2020 is the classic example. What led to the security shortcuts was not just the abrupt change to work from home, but the fact that companies typically had to make the transition in a few days.

Add to that increased problems with IoT security — especially as IoT devices in home environments accessed global systems via VPNs, sometimes spreading malware through the pipeline — and you have a mess. A recent Verizon mobile security report put it bluntly: “Almost half of respondents admitted that their company had knowingly cut corners on mobile device security. That’s an increase from our 2020 report when the figure was 46%. The proportion rises to two-thirds [67%] in our IoT sample. And of those remaining, 38% (27% IoT) came under pressure to do so. Another way of looking at this is that 68% came under pressure to cut corners and 72% of those succumbed.”

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Details of how the feds broke into iPhones should shake up enterprise IT

Credit to Author: Evan Schuman| Date: Mon, 19 Apr 2021 03:18:00 -0700

Apple has an awkward history with security researchers: it wants to tout that its security is excellent, which means trying to silence those who aim to prove otherwise. But those attempts to fight security researchers who sell their information to anyone other than Apple undercuts the company’s security message.

A recent piece in The Washington Post spilled the details behind Apple’s legendary fight with the U.S. government in 2016, when the Justice Department pushed Apple to create a security backdoor related to the iPhone used by a terrorist in the San Bernardino shooting. Apple refused; the government pursued it in court. Then when the government found a security researcher who offered a way to bypass Apple security, the government abandoned its legal fight. The exploit worked and, anticlimactically, nothing of value to the government was found on the device.

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The Patch Tuesday focus for April: Windows and Exchange (again)

Credit to Author: Greg Lambert| Date: Fri, 16 Apr 2021 10:57:00 -0700

On Tuesday, MIcrosoft rolled out another broad series of updates across its Windows ecosystems, including four vulnerabilities affecting Windows that have been publicly disclosed and one security flaw — reportedly exploited already — that affects the Windows kernel. That means the Windows updates get our highest “Patch Now” rating, and if you have to manage Exchange servers, be aware that the update requires additional privileges and extra steps to complete.

It also looks as if Microsoft has announced a new way to deploy updates to any device, wherever it is located, with the Windows Update for Business Service. For more information on this cloud-based management service, you can check out this Microsoft video or this Computerworld FAQ. I have included ahelpful infographic which this month looks a little lopsided (again) as all of the attention should be on the Windows and Exchange components.

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Appogee becomes one-stop shop for enterprise iOS deployment

Credit to Author: Jonny Evans| Date: Fri, 16 Apr 2021 07:21:00 -0700

The Apple-focused enterprise services market continues to evolve. Case in point: Apple-only value-added-reseller Appogee is now offering a fully-managed iOS hardware deployment thanks to an arrangement with TRUCE Software.

A one-stop enterprise mobile shop

At its simplest, this means enterprises choosing to deploy iOS devices across their business can approach Appogee to purchase, deploy, and create contextually-aware management tools for these new fleets. The system integrates tools from both TRUCE and Jamf and means businesses can accelerate their mobile strategy, and do so while ensuring their own policies can be enforced on a device and user basis.

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Apple and Google reject UK COVID-19 app

Credit to Author: Jonny Evans| Date: Tue, 13 Apr 2021 08:59:00 -0700

Apple and Google have been forced to reject the UK’s latest COVID-19 Test and Trace app update because it failed to follow privacy rules the nation had already agreed to follow in order to use the frameworks the tech firms provide.

Keeping deals

In line with World Health Organization (WHO) advice to test widely and act fast in the event of COVID-19 outbreaks, Apple and Google moved quickly at the beginning of the pandemic to develop a private-by-design Exposure Notifications system the world’s health authorities could use to build digital track-and-trace systems.

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Collaboration analytics: Yes, you can track employees. Should you?

Credit to Author: Matthew Finnegan| Date: Mon, 12 Apr 2021 03:00:00 -0700

From email to video meetings and team chat, collaboration applications have become vital tools to connect workers. And by giving companies the tools to track employee use of these apps, software vendors can provide insights into working patterns and help organizations better understand how they operate.

The ability to view analytics data in collaboration and productivity software is not new; such products have long provided admins with a snapshot of app utilization. Typically aimed at gauging user uptake and tracking deployment progress, these metrics were otherwise limited in their wider business use.

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