For Windows users, tips on fighting ransomware attacks

Credit to Author: Susan Bradley| Date: Mon, 17 May 2021 07:30:00 -0700

Ransomware.

It’s one word that strikes fear in the minds of many a computer user, especially given the near daily headlines about companies affected. It makes us wonder why this keeps happening to users and businesses, large and small.

But there’s plenty you can do to protect yourself or your business.

Be wary of what you click on

Most of the time, ransomware that affects an individual happens after someone clicks on something they shouldn’t — maybe a phishing-related email or a web page that installs malicious files. In a business setting, the attacks often come from an attacker going after open remote access protocol, either using brute force or harvested credentials. Once inside the network, they can disable backups and lie in wait until the best time to attack.

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Browser updates are back for the May's Patch Tuesday

Credit to Author: Greg Lambert| Date: Fri, 14 May 2021 12:37:00 -0700

With 55 updates, three publicly reported vulnerabilities and reported public exploits for Adobe Reader, this week’s Patch Tuesday update will require some time and testing before deployment. There are some tough testing scenarios (we’re looking at you, OLE) and kernel updates make for risky deployments. Focus on the IE and Adobe Reader patches — and take your time with the (technically challenging) Exchange and Windows updates.

Speaking of taking your time, if you’re still Windows 10 1909, this is your last month of security updates. 

The three publicly disclosed vulnerabilities this month include:

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The Patch Tuesday focus for April: Windows and Exchange (again)

Credit to Author: Greg Lambert| Date: Fri, 16 Apr 2021 10:57:00 -0700

On Tuesday, MIcrosoft rolled out another broad series of updates across its Windows ecosystems, including four vulnerabilities affecting Windows that have been publicly disclosed and one security flaw — reportedly exploited already — that affects the Windows kernel. That means the Windows updates get our highest “Patch Now” rating, and if you have to manage Exchange servers, be aware that the update requires additional privileges and extra steps to complete.

It also looks as if Microsoft has announced a new way to deploy updates to any device, wherever it is located, with the Windows Update for Business Service. For more information on this cloud-based management service, you can check out this Microsoft video or this Computerworld FAQ. I have included ahelpful infographic which this month looks a little lopsided (again) as all of the attention should be on the Windows and Exchange components.

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Microsoft Patch Tuesday, April 2021 Edition

Credit to Author: BrianKrebs| Date: Tue, 13 Apr 2021 23:12:19 +0000

Microsoft today released updates to plug at least 110 security holes in its Windows operating systems and other products. The patches include four security fixes for Microsoft Exchange Server — the same systems that have been besieged by attacks on four separate (and zero-day) bugs in the email software over the past month. Redmond also patched a Windows flaw that is actively being exploited in the wild.

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Microsoft hands IT admins beefed-up Windows release health hub

Credit to Author: Gregg Keizer| Date: Wed, 31 Mar 2021 03:00:00 -0700

Microsoft has begun rolling out its Windows release health dashboard to the Microsoft 365 admin portal, a move the company previewed earlier this month at its all-virtual Ignite conference.

“This will be a phased rollout and we expect this information experience to be available to all applicable customers by the end of April,” Mabel Gomes, senior communications program manager in the Windows group, said in a March 25 post to a company blog.

The original Windows release health launched almost two years ago as one of the changes Microsoft instituted after the disastrous debut of Windows 10 1809, the fall 2018 version of the operating system that had to be yanked from release because it deleted data.

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